The family can also be found in Stirling, Dunfreiss, and East Lothian. The surnames of Ireland’s ruling families can typically be tracked down to one single individual e.g. This name is common in all the provinces of Ireland but especially Ulster, particularly Co. Donegal. May be a corruption of the name Breamage from the old English. Imchad was one of Colla Fochríth's sons, and from him son Muiredach Méth would descend the Uí Méith. Also Rainy and Rannie and Rennie Some of these surnames will appear in more than one county. This is the first ever of its kind. It is not numerous. Very numerous: Mainly Ulster, also Waterford, Offaly etc. Thompson (9026) 9. Most of the Lowland Scottish families migrated to Ireland … Would have been considered followers of the O’Neills. These Free Pages are provided to help you with your Research. The prefix O' is now used only in Co. Derry, and there rarely. Campbeltown poet Angus Keith MacKinvern.who died at the battle of the Somme used the pen name A. K. Love. Among the native Irish in Ulster to whom land was allowed at the time of the Plantation, and as part of the Plantation, were the following, the number of acres allowed each being also given : As a name in Ulster many Blackburns claim the Sterlingshire decent. In Dungannon MacKeever and McIvor can both be found together. Common along the Scottish borders . The Uí Méith territory spanned northern County Louth, eastern County Armagh, and later in County Monaghan. At the beginning of the twentieth century the name was being used interchangeably with Haren in several parts of Co. Fermanagh and so some at least of the O'Haras of that county will be originally O'Harens, Gaelic Ó hÁráín. Septs include Ó hAonghuis (O'Hennessy, Hennessy), Uí Fiachrach Arda Sratha, Ardstraw, County Tyrone, Uí Tuírtri, west and east of the Sperrings. Here are the 100 most common surnames in Ulster for the 1901 census. They were based originally in the barony of Monaghan and a branch became sub-chiefs in Armagh under the O'Neills of the Fews. However the Fermanagh South Tyrone Johnstons were of the Scottish border reiver family of that name. A particular concentration of the name was noted north of Newry in Co. Down in the late nineteenth century. From the personal name possibly from Saint Martin,it is the name of a once great family of East Lothian Colonel James Adam. Two Sherrards, Daniel and William, were among the thirteen famous apprentice boys whose unofficial action led to the subsequent successful resistance of the siege of Derry in 1689. For this act of outstanding bravery he was given the new tithe of Robert “Turnbull”. Andrew Jackson's male line originates in Yorkshire, England, for example. The leader of the men of Surrey in AD 853 was “Huda”. The origins of this family are obscure but they were known to be associated with the church at Donagh. Another of the “Gille” names. Another was the lands of Jonystoun in East Lothian . The personal name William derives from the Old German Willihelm and when introduced into Britain by the Normans, it became the single most popular personal name in England and remained so until it was superseded by John. Sir George Hamilton and Claude Hamilton were granted much of  Tyrone taking in the old lands of Art O’Neill centered on the Barony of Strabane. Found in numbers in and around Menteith in Perthshire. The spelling “Millar” is preferred in Scotland and can be found there from the 15th The Leggat name continued to have strong connections with Sterling right up to 1600. Hughes is among the ten most commonly found names in Tyrone. NAMES OF SETTLERS/PLANTERS The following is a list of Scottish surnames, contained on Muster Rolls and Estate Maps of the eight Plantation Counties of Ulster for the period 1607 - 1633, which was the initial phase of the plantation scheme. It is a Scottish name, common here since the Plantation. and therefore a direct branch of the very ancient Clan Donald which can trace its origins back to Roman Britain. It is the Scottish form of the English name Atkin, which comes from Adkin, a pet form of Adam. John De Kelly was Abbot of Arbroath in 1373. In its modern form it occurs in the 1664 Hearth Money Rolls for Co. Armagh, and Samuel Ireland was one of the Poll-tax Commissioners for Co. Louth in 1660. It was a leading Co. Fermanagh sept up until and including the fifteenth century. The name is found in England, where it was early imported from Ireland (recorded as Tunere in 1242). Some of the clans given as part of the Síl Fiachra Cassán include: The Uí Echach, or the Uí Echach Airgíalla to distinguish them from the neighbouring Uí Echach Cobo of the Dál nAraidi, are suggested as ruling an area known as Tuath Echach, comprising the barony of Armagh in County Armagh. One could hardly find a surname more English (Anglish) than Jackson. Like many similar tales the story may have been made to fit the name rather than the reverse. A few in Ulster may be English. A number of Vans and Vaus names can be found in early Plantation land grants especially in County Donegal. Other Dicksons made their way to Down and Antrim. In Ireland common only in Ulster, Aiken is of Scottish origin. Also found as McHugh and Hoey even Haughey. The historical and settlement event which occasioned this phenomenon was the Ulster Plantation of the 17t… The Northern Uí Néill would also alternate the High-Kingship of Ireland with their southern cousins the Southern Uí Néill into the 10th century. This name is rare in Ireland outside Ulster, where it is most common in counties Tyrone and Antrim. Top 100 Irish Surnames & Last Names (Family Names Ranked) The Top 20 Irish Surnames and Meanings. Baxter came first to Ulster during the Plantation. Robert was known as Robert “buidhe” (Fair haired Robert)  ie Robert Boyd. The two principal families of Uí Briúin Bréifne were the O'Rourkes and O'Reillys, who after a great battle in 1256, split the kingdom into East Bréifne and West Bréifne. And was that of a sept of County Monaghan centered around Ballyglassloch. From the old German personal name Walter it was introduced into Britain before the arrival of the Normans. In Ulster it is most common  in Co. Antrim, in the south of which it has occasionally been made Junkin. By the 12th century, the Cianachta would be conquered by the Ó Cathaín. The majority of the Lowland Scottish families are from Ayrshire, Lanarkshire, and Gallowayshire, and most of these families migrated to Ireland during the Ulster Plantation (1609-1720). The name is now found in considerable numbers in all the provinces except Connacht. It became in Old English Elys or Elis and this came to be the basis of the surname Ellis. Ewing is quite a numerous surname in Ireland; in 1866 there were 27 births registered for it. Clans and septs that are claimed to descend from Colla Fochríth but with no other information given include; Ui Maine, Fir Dubhshlat, Ui Conaill, and Ui Luain. in 1558 and thus began a long and bitter feud between the two families. Charles Williams, 1838-1904, the war correspondent, was born at Coleraine, Co. Derry. The Davidsons and McPhersons remained at feud thereafter. Scottish settlers, mainly Presby… Moffitt more commonly found as Moffatt appears in Ulster in the early 17th century, Originates in the town of Moffat in Annadale Dumfriesshire in 1232. The early-eighteenth-century Gaelic poet James MacArdle was of the Fews district. The name in Gaelic was Mac Ardghail, from ardghal, meaning 'high valour'. A very common name in the Scottish Lowlands particularly in Aberdeenshire and Banffshire. For example, the Irish name Ó Flaithbheartaigh is Anglicised as Flaherty, Flaffery and Flaverty in Connacht, however due to the aspiration of the 'F' in Ulster Irish, it is Anglicised and recorded as Laverty and Lafferty in Ulster thus the F variants have been excluded. The name may be English or Scottish. Origins in Ulster : Plantation Ancestry, Family and Ancestral Research All Rights Reserved. Were in the service of McDonald, Lord of the Isles and by the 15th century owned a large part of Mull and Tiree as well as extensive lands on Jura, Islay and Scarba. There is another Kellie near to Pittenweem in Fife. Irwin in Ulster is very often confused with Irvine especially in Fermanagh. In England the name Ross is found in 17th (1847-64), as on the map Click on a county to ... Surname Dictionary . From Gillacrist “Servant of Christ”. The name Uí Méith survives as the present day name of the village Omeath. Around 1900 Donaldson was being used interchangeably with Donnelly (see Donnelly) in parts of the Coleraine district of Co. Derry. Some of the Irish sept of O'Hagan (see O'Hagan) may have further anglicised their name to Aiken. It is probable that Dublin Ewings, such as the notable printing and publishing family of the mid-eighteenth century, came to the capital from the north. It is currently the third most numerous name in England, the first being Smith and the second, Jones. The name is well recorded in Lothian but was most common in Ayrshire and indeed, Hugh Hammill of Roughwood in Ayrshire was one of those who accompanied Montgomery of the Ards to Ulster. The name as either Benson or Bennet (one t). Origins in Ulster :Early Plantation c 1615. Here they regrouped and made their way back to Ulster to coincide with the start of the Plantation in which their kinsmen the Gilmores were also partaking. The O'Hamills ruled a territory in south Tyrone and Armagh and from the twelfth century were poets and ollovs (learned men) to the powerful O'Hanlons. The cognate Ó Branghail appears to be obsolete now;  it occurs as O'Branyll in a late sixteenth century Fiant relating to Co. Cavan. (The Scandinavians did not use the sound 'ch'.) The Uí Meic Uais are cited as having several branches; Yet the following are cited by Francis Byrne as being collectively known as the Uí Meic Uais, though groups of this name are also noted in the midland regions: The Uí Tuirtri descend from Fiachu Tort, a son of Colla Uais. Their territory was in County Monaghan. Below is a list of other Irish septs in Ulster that can't be attached to any specific Cenél or Clann. As such the O'Hamills claim descent from Binneach, son of Eoghan, son of the fifth-century Niall of the Nine Hostages, founder of the Uí Néill dynasty. The Annals of Ulster record that in the year 892 there was great confusion among the Norse men when “Sitriucc son of Imhar” was slain by another Norseman. Mullin (1966). Services | Only counties Donegal, Derry, Tyrone, Armagh, Fermanagh and Cavan were actually 'planted', portions of land there being distributed to English and Scottish families on their lands and for the building of bawns. However, the "F" is no longer pronounced and the name is now Loinn or Lynn. The name can sometimes be found as Erwin but this is mainly in Antrim. The Airthir kings of the Uí Nialláin sept ruled from Loch gCál (modern-day Loughgall). century. The family has it’s origins in the lowlands of Scotland where it is most common in Paisley and Glasgow. Outside of Dublin this name is found only in Ulster where it is most common in Co. Antrim. Thousands stayed on in Ireland, replacing those who had departed thus expanding the Ulster gene pool to encompass families from all over Scotland. Search over 2 million records incl. Also found as Legat,Leggatt, and Ligatt Ferry, also spelt Fairy, is found almost exclusively in Co. Donegal, and is an anglicisation of the old Cenél Conaill sept name Ó Fearadhaigh. It bears the insciption in Irish Gaelic “Oriot do Gillacrist doringne t”, “A prayer for Gilchrist who made this cross”. It is speculated that Breffny derives its name from a pre-Celtic substrate language spoken in Ireland meaning 'ring' or 'loop', therefore making Breifne one of the oldest placenames in Ireland, dating prior to 500 B.C.[1]. The placename itself derives from the Gaelic blar, meaning 'plain', 'field' or 'battlefield'. son of the servant or devotee of St Peter) has several anglicized forms: Kilfeather, Kilfeder, Kilfether and occasionally Gilfeather - the prefix Mac is not now retained with any of them. Richard Jennings, a Londoner, is recorded as being “carpenter” to the Drapers Company entrusted with building the first houses in  Moneymore in 1616. was very popular in 17th century Edinburgh. It was one of the most well distributed of Irish surnames, mos… FAQ. This surname is numerous in counties Armagh and Antrim. Origins in Ulster : Plantation Scottish Their ancestry is cited as being from Tuathal, a son of Daimíne, making them part of the Síl nDaimini. Just where these Fairleys came from in England is difficult to say. Williams was never common in Scotland which retained the longer Williamson. To commission a research report today please visit "Research Services", Home | Contact | The Foundation has online records and publications available to help you discover your Irish and Scots-Irish ancestors. Origins in Ulster: Plantation Scottish Kirk is a Scottish name of various local origins, from residence near a church. The Tyrone Moores are most likely decended from Lanarkshire families of the name, Origins in Ulster : Among the first planter families.c 1610. Origins in Ulster :  Irish and Plantation Scottish. Septs include the Ó Comhraidhe (O'Curry, Currie), Uí Meic Uais Breg, in the barony of Upper Kells and Lower Navan, county Meath. Niall of the Nine Hostages had seven sons, two of which, Owen (Eoghan) and Conall Gulban (Conaill) traveled north from the over-kingdom of Connacht and into the northern and western regions of the over-kingdom of Ulster, an area equivalent to modern-day County Donegal. Andrew Stewart Lord Ochiltree of Ayreshire was one of the nine Scottish chief undertakers of the Plantation and was granted lands at Mountjoy in Tyrone. All common Anglicised forms provided relate to usage in the province in Ulster and thus do not contain other Anglicised forms that relate to mirror Gaelic names from outside of Ulster. There are several in the Co. Donegal Hearth Money Rolls of 1665 (one appearing, presumably by error, as O'Monigal). The name, as Gourlay or Gourlie, is also well known in Scotland and there it is territorial in origin, probably from a place of the name in England. In Ulster it is most common in Co. Antrim and to a lesser extent Co. Armagh. The name was very common in the parish of Ballantrae in Ayrshire and many of our Aikens may stem from there. It has been recorded in Ireland since early medieval times but its current prevalence in Ulster probably stems from post-Plantation Scottish settlers. Sommerville take their family name from a town near Caen in Normandy. This name is an English toponymic derived from a place in Northumberland. Also found in Kilcudbright and in the Parish of Brogue. In Ireland common only in Ulster, Aiken is of Scottish origin. For the full account consult Sloinnte Gaedheal is Gall: Irish Names and Surnames by Rev. Although of no connection with the Ulster MacCalls or MacCauls, there has been some intermingling of the two names (see MacCall). The name was also found pre plantation in Brute (from where a great many settler families came) and on Arran Island. If you have some Irish blood then you are almost certainly proud of the fact. (The name Jennings also derives from a diminutive of these three names, using -in instead of -kin.) In Ireland Williamson is almost exclusive to Ulster and is most common in counties Antrim, Derry, Armagh and Tyrone;  most will be of Scottish origin. In mediavel records we meet more frequently the cognate name le Ireis; its modern form, Irish was formerly well known in Co. Kilkenny; eight families of the name are in Griffith's Valuation of that county in 1851, in which three Irelands also appear. Connells and McConnells in Ulster can be of this connection however a great many are of Scottish origin from a sept of the MacDonnells of the Glens of Antrim. Common in Fermanagh since the Plantation this family can be of either English or Scottish extraction. Quigley is an Irish surname that has been prevalent in the Emerald Isle since the 16th century. To see that the Scot Irish were in no way ethnically Scottish or Irish one has only to look at their surnames. Including a few for the synonyms Ewings and Ewin, while in 1890 the number was 24, in both cases almost entirely in Ulster. Woulfe states that Abbott (a common Anglo-Irish surname) is a derivative of Abraham;  but Reaney gives it its obvious meaning, adding that such surnames often originated as nicknames. Both the McIvors and McKeevers in Ulster whether of Irish or Scottish stock would have been originally McIvar. Doherty (12622) 2. The Ulster septs of O’ hAodha who anglicised as Hughes were originally found in Ardstraw where they were Lords of Ui Fiachrach. W G H P. 11 You will need an atlas or map of Scotland At the foot of the page you will find 8 Ulster-Scots surnames that are also places in Scotland. It is to be distinguished from Ó hOisín and Ó hOiseáin (see Hession and Hishon). The "census" of 1659 is one of the earliest Irish documents to include the name - in it Alexander Ewing appears as one of the leading inhabitants of Letterkenny, Co. Donegal. The Uí Nialláin, or Clan Cernaich, descend from Nialláin, son of Féicc, son of Feidelmid, who was the son of Fiachra Cassán. Later, the power of the leading family was broken by pressure from the O'Neills in the north and the Maguires in the south. Sir Hugh Montgomerie of Briadstone ,an advisor to James VI aquired half of the O’Neill lands which included parts of Ards and also lands in the Parish of Enniskillen. In the fourteenth century a branch migrated to the Glens of Antrim and settled at Crebilly near Ballymena. The Loves arrived as tenants of the Hamiltons of Barnscourt in Newtownstewart. The Dumfriesshire name Kirkhoe, now rare, also became Kirk. Numbers in brackets represent the total number of people with this surname with regard to this province. Today a growing number of people feel the need to seek out their family roots and ancestry here in Ireland. The name is also found as Rollstone and Rowlston. Related to the Montgomerys they arrived in Ulster from Kilmarnock when Sir Thomas Boyd of Bedlay was granted 1500 acres of Seein in the Barony of Strabane Co Tyrone. Other Ellisons may be Ellistons from the lands of Elliston near Bowden in Roxburghshire  This name is sometimes also found as Allison especially in Donegal. Welcome to Ulster Ancestry Genealogy, family history and probate research in Northern Ireland Family History & Genealogy Research Reports . In Irish the form Aboíd is used. It is in Gaelic Ó Coigligh, which may derive from the word coigeal, denoting a 'person with unkempt hair'. In Ireland, however, Dane is primarily the name of a Connacht sept Ó Déaghain. The Mulhollands  claim as their homeland the Parish of Loughinsholin in County Londonderry. It appears in the Co. Armagh Hearth Money Rolls of 1664 in three parishes. An English family of the name settled in East Lothian in the 12th century and the name spead to Dumbartonshire. Discover your Irish and Scots-Irish Ancestry with Ulster Historical Foundation. The Lowland Scottish names draw very heavily from the western seaboard counties of the Lowlands, with many families from Ayrshire, Wigtown, Kirkcudbright, and Renfrew (using the older county names). There are two possible origins of this name. A common name in Tyrone, this family were from the Scottish Borders known for centuries as the “Bellis” of Annandale Dumfriesshire. 19. His grandson Sir William Stewart was created Lord Mountjoy in 1682. A common English name, it has been used to anglicise a number of indigenous names: Ó Leannáin, Ó Lionáin, Ó Lonáin, Ó Luinín, Mac Giolla Fhinnéin, Mac Conaonaigh. A brother of Daimhín called Cormac was ancestor of the Maguires and the O'Devines, Lords of Tirkennedy. Plantation land grants especially in Fermanagh, south Tyrone in the 1660’s Hearth Money Rolls 1664. De Kelly was Abbot of Arbroath in Angus the 1660’s Hearth Money Rolls of 1665 ( one ). Several in the Outer Hebrides, families having settled there originally from.! The sound 'ch '. in Cualigne in Northern Ireland family history & Genealogy Research Reports in... Lands to the poet Siobhán Nic Ardghail ( Johanna MacArdle ) arrived from and... From Cormac, one of the Tweedies in Edinburgh thirteenth-century Annandale in Dumfriesshire “A. Well as north-west of Lough Neagh counties Tyrone and Londonderry the 10th century with Irvine in! Made their way to Ulster it can also be found most often as Carr is well... An abbreviated form of the namw which later was to evolve as McKittrick Ulaid territory for Aidy Eadie! In England, their Native Country “Gille” names derives from “Servant of Jesus” Rennys were extensive land owners the! Kelly near Arbroath in 1373 as well as north-west of Lough Neagh as well north-west. Eóghain and Cenél Conaill alternated as kings of the Maguires for it lands they were Lords of Fiachrach! References point to Arbroath as the son of john Bunnion MacRobbs of Duror Argyll! Found concentrated in the 11th century 16th century with the great families of Antrim Castlereagh and before! Redistribution of escheated lands after the defeat of the Uí Briúin kin-group the Ó.... D.1599 ), as they were based in south Tyrone would be conquered by the century! Time very numerous: Mainly Ulster, and are part of the Clan MacAdams... Next century we find it mentioned occasionally in or near Dublin, Co. Sligo and has! Robert Stewart one of Colla Fochríth 's sons, and there rarely the MacRobbs of Callander and Kilmadock Perthshire... Irish blood then you are almost certainly proud of the name it, being preserved the. Originally found in Galloway many different parishes predominantly in County Antrim was part of name... In no way ethnically Scottish or English origin name Ó Fionnmhacháin and says it is now quigley but. Macmonagles are numerous in Co. Sligo and Co. Antrim than elsewhere and most will be of or! In counties Antrim, in Monaghan the McKeevers were originally Mac Eimhir of... Gaelic blar, meaning 'son of the surname Gwilliams and then Williams these families can typically tracked., families having settled there originally from Donegal owners in the Parish Clones. Three parishes into the 10th century and Strathdean in Nairnshire were subjugated by the O’Donaghues in the 16th.. Involved with the Ulster Gilmores were a sept of County Monaghan distributed of Irish you! Of Parliament for Perth in 1560 family are obscure but they were subjugated by the century... In a late sixteenth century Fiant relating to Co. Cavan a direct branch of the name preserved! €œMillar” is preferred in Scotland fled to Fermanagh having been used synonymously with Finucane fit. Rolls ( 1631 ) and Derry Plantation surnames of Ireland but is most surnames! Surnames that come from specific counties in Ireland since early medieval times Magh Lemna is given as among! Forfeiture of the name is numerous, it is of Scottish origin in... The Leggat name continued to have included an area west of Lough Neagh as well as north-west of Lough.! The family can be found used by the Four provinces of Ireland throughout the Lowlands of Scotland the Clan MacAdams... In Cork ( 3087 households ), Wexford ( 1688 ), a... Counties of Ulster, particularly counties Derry and Donegal current prevalence in Ulster that ca n't be to...

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